Tagged: interviews

Thomas Newman on Lemony Snicket

Here’s a great interview with Thomas Newman on the Lemony Snicket score (one of my personal favorites of his). The link comes courtesy of Film & Game Composers, so thanks to Emmett Cooke for the original post.

The video concentrates on the orchestral recordings, not necessarily the most interesting or unusual part of a Thomas Newman score, but still fascinating and educational. He talks about the danger of overwriting, the trouble with describing characters through music, and his technique of experimenting with small ensembles and how that effects his orchestral writing. Especially instructive are his thoughts on having the director hear the music numerous times in his studio before the recording session, which allows the director to have plenty of opportunities to reject ideas while there’s still time to change them.

Bear McCreary on Scoring The Walking Dead

In this video from his blog, Bear McCreary talks about writing the music for the hit series The Walking Dead. He talks about the different stages in the process, from consulting with director Frank Darabont to working with the orchestrators and recording the cues. One of the interesting aspects of The Walking Dead in particular is that the score combines a small string section with bluegrass instruments and synths. Bear and Steve Kaplan, his engineer, talk about the difficulties of combining these sounds and making it all work together.

Bear is a master at promoting his work and sharing information with his fans, and this video is no exception. Where he finds the time in the crazy schedule of a television composer to not only write blog posts but also record videos is beyond me, but all his work has clearly paid off and his fan base just keeps growing. Check out his entire blog here.

Thanks to New Film Scores for the post.

Two Composer Interviews

First, apologies for being away for so long. I was working on a score for a feature that only seemed to get larger and more complex the closer we got to the deadline. Unfortunately in situations like that, the blog is one of the first things to go (along with free time, sleeping and going to the gym). More on that particular job soon.

Meanwhile, here are a couple of composer interviews that were broadcast this past week. The first is a two-hour retrospective of John Williams’ long and storied career from Classic FM. Williams talks about his creative process and about composing some of the most iconic film music of our time. He is his usual generous and gracious self, and he’s candid and open about his life and his work, from composing for Steven Spielberg and George Lucas to playing piano on To Kill a Mockingbird and many other classic scores. Definitely worth a listen.

The other interview is with someone a bit less well-known. NPR’s Weekend Edition Sunday talked with ad composer Keith Kenniff this past weekend about his work on spots for Apple, Prudential and Toyota. It’s a revealing look into the world of ad music, and Kenniff’s work demonstrates how to use live recordings of acoustic instruments to get a wonderfully contemporary sound.

Creating the Best Score for Your (Documentary) Film

Photo by Steve Rhodes

I stumbled across this blog post on Documentary.org while wandering the Web. It’s an interview with six film composers about the peculiar art of scoring documentary films. They talk about the idiosyncrasies of the music in documentaries, when they typically get brought on board, schedules and budgets, and much more.

By being involved earlier I had a longer time to conceive of the music…. You can’t speed up the process of just ruminating on something creatively.”

As a composer currently working on two docs, I found numerous bits of wisdom to take away. One of my favorite parts was the lengthy discussion of the pros and cons of temp music and how best to deal with temp scores (always a hot topic). They also talk a lot about the power of music in documentaries and what it can bring to the table—great fodder for your next negotiation with a client who’s balking at your bid.

While geared toward documentary composers, there’s plenty in the post for dramatic composers and filmmakers as well. Much of the discussion centers around the composition process and every film’s need for great music. These are universal topics, and the composers in question speak eloquently about the subject. All in all a worthy read.

Composers Confab: Creating the Best Score for Your Film

SoundWorks Collection

Here’s a cool website to check out: SoundWorksCollection.com. The site is mainly geared towards sound designers and not composers, but there are still a decent number of videos about music alone (or more often, sound and music).

Of particular note, there have been excellent videos recently on the music of Cars 2, The Fighter and 127 Hours, as well as the video games Angry Birds and Halo Reach. One quibble: clicking on Videos > Original Soundtracks doesn’t bring up a complete list of music-based videos, so you’ll need to search through the archives a bit to find the videos on film music.